CNN: YouTube burnout is real. Creators are struggling to cope. | Michael Grover


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CNN: YouTube burnout is real. Creators are struggling to cope.

Over the past few years, creators have started openly discussing feeling burnt out, which often comes from the pressure to constantly churn out new videos for their thousands -- sometimes millions -- of fans.

December 19, 2019 Go to CNN

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